PGPT336
Date: c.2001
Source: photograph by volunteer

One Sunday a visitor to the garden remarked that we were not growing a palm in the Palm house. a few weeks later he returned with the gift of a trachycarpus fortunei which has flourished in this sheltered position.

PGPT267
Date: early 2000s
Source: photograph by volunteer
The label of this plant states: “This Hebe has a direct connection with Queen Victoria. She gave a sprig from her wedding bouquet to the wife of the Bishop of Norwich in 1840. It was propagated successfully, and our plant is a daughter of the hebe which flourishes in the Bishop’s garden today”.

Historians have been rude enough to dispute this claim, made on behalf of a number of plants in different bishops’ gardens, by saying that in fact myrtle, not hebe, was the plant in the bouquet, and that it was Queen Victoria’s daughter, not the queen herself, who carried myrtle in her wedding bouquet. However, we like the original story.

PGPT335
Date: 2001 or 2002

In 2001 a thoroughly Victorian theme was given to the summer fete – it was, after all, the centenary of Queen Victoria’s death. Actors impersonated the Queen and her heir. In 2002 we celebrated Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee. On both occasions the garden – and of course the tea tent shown here – was decorated with flags.

The ladies who made cakes and served teas deserve a special mention in the history of the PGPT, for they gave many hours of time and trouble to the numerous tasks involved in providing teas on the lawn on summer Sundays to an appreciative public. The result of their work was a considerable contribution annually to the funds available to the garden. Gretchen Mason, also Hon Sec at the time, was the first ‘Tsarina of the teas’ in 1999, Nancy Stewart (picture centre, in mob cap) was ‘Queen of the cakes’ and others since have carried on their very good work, giving up their summer Sundays to this cause.

PGPT330
Date: early 2000s
Source: photograph by volunteer

In the foreground of this picture of the long west bed beside the main lawn can be seen part of the magnificent display of dahlias planted there for a year or two. Unfortunately they were discovered by a muntjac deer which arrived (probably from Earlham cemetery) and ate them. We did not want to encourage visitations by deer, so abandoned the idea of dahlias!

In the background can be seen the rustic bridge and glazed ‘shed’.

PGPT254
Date: c 2002
Source: photograph by volunteer

From the early days of restoration of the garden the PGPT volunteer guides have taken groups around the garden talking about its history and significance. The letter shown in PGPT414 illustrates the appreciation felt by many visitors.
On special occasions, such as the Queen’s Jubilee, or for children’s groups, the guides have adopted Victorian style costume.
The rustic bridge is a favourite spot for taking a photograph of the view to the south (cf PGPT403), although here the guide is pointing north, probably to the monkey puzzle tree planted just north of the bridge.

PGPT327
Date: 2002
Source: photograph by volunteer

The red white and blue of the bedding scheme celebrates the Queen’s Golden Jubilee.

PGPT253
Date: 2003
Source: photograph by volunteer

This shows the early stages of the restoration of the retaining wall which appears in PGPT252. Michael Herring, the builder who undertook the restoration appears at the left. As in other restoration work, the materials used were found in the garden, and the style was copied from the other, 19c, walls. See PGPT368 for Michael’s own description of his method of work. The restored wall is shown in PGPT262.

PGPT368
Date: 2003
Source: photograph by volunteer Sarah Cocke

This retaining wall in the south-east corner of the lower lawn had largely collapsed by 1980, when the garden was ‘discovered’. Restoration was begun here in 2003, by Michael Herring, a builder who had done a lot of work on traditional buildings.The lower parts of this wall were still in situ, so the plan was clear, and for materials he had plenty of the original bricks and flints which he bound with an old-fashioned mortar, using a natural lime mix to give an authentic look. As for the design, as he said himself, ‘the best guide is the other walls, with their mixture of flints and plain and fancy bricks, so I’ve imitated the 19th century craftsmen.’ He worked out a pattern, and then had a consultation with Bruce and Sheila Adam……we kept trying out different ideas until we got there.’

PGPT104
Date: 2001-2004
Source: Photograph by volunteer

This photograph of the fountain shows how its plan ressembles an irregular triangle. The dog/lion faces repeated around the frieze are probably from Gunton Bros stock of fancy bricks, and perhaps the brick with the man’s face is from the same source. Visitors like to think this is a portrait of Henry Trevor himself! They also often think that the material used is carved stone, but it is actually moulded bricks made by Gunton Bros.

PGPT135
Date: June 2004
Source: Photograph by volunteer

The photograph shows the recreated rustic summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace steps (see PGPT114). The heather roof is still in reasonable condition here. This photograph shows more clearly the ‘swan’ decoration on the front panels, inspired by the panels seen in the 1886 photograph ( ) of Henry Trevor’s original summerhouse.

PGPT285
Date: June 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

Information boards in various parts of the garden help visitors to appreciate its history. With the help of charitable grants, boards have been set up to give the history of Trevor Page (Henry Trevor’s firm, cf PGPT133); of the Palm House; of the rustic summerhouse; and of the creation of the garden.

PGPT268
Date: 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

Red, white and blue are the colours used for this bedding scheme on the upper lawn, with a banana tree giving height in the centre.

PGPT260
Date: July 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

Many of the original steps at the top of the flight up to the Italian terrace had become worn and a possible hazard for the public, so in 2004 new ‘Mooncrete’ steps were used to replace the damaged ones, though care was taken to retain or re-use the originals where possible.
In the background can be seen the restored summerhouse, and the pedestal decorated with pebble flints and Gunton Bros ‘fancy’ bricks (cf PGPT354/5).

PGPT264
Date: 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

Volunteer Eric is doing some repair work to the flint and brick shed, which was rebuilt in the 1990s on the site of an earlier building, shown on the 1883 O.S. map south of the gardener’s cottage (PGPT034).

PGPT371 shows its position relative to the Plantation house.

PGPT261
Date: 2004
Source: Planting scheme drawn by Marj Wilson

Marj Wilson, Head Gardener, has provided visitors each year with beautiful drawings of the planting plans of various beds in the garden, both the perennial beds and summer (as here) or winter bedding. Visitors can often be seen studying the laminated copies of these drawings placed in stands in the garden.

PGPT257
Date: c 2004
Source: Britain in Bloom photographer

Twice a year, spring and autumn, volunteers come together on a Sunday morning to plant summer or winter bedding. Marj Wilson, head gardener (2nd from left) plans the schemes, after discussion with a sub-committee, then purchases and organises the arrival of the plants for the day. Many hands make light work!

PGPT097
Date 2004
Source Photgraph by volunteer

‘Britain in Bloom’ is a competition organised between various parts of Britain. This photograph was taken when the judges visited The Plantation in 2004 as part of the Norwich entry for the competition.

The very attractive planting in the beds originally within the Palm House can be seen here. Marjorie Wilson, Head Gardener, who designed and organised the planting of these beds, is on the right, talking to Sheila Adam (archivist) and Bruce Adam (chairman).

The small glasshouse was erected in 2000 with a grant from the lottery fund for the practical purpose of housing chairs and tables for Sunday teas. The design was copied from old photographs of the glazed entrance to the boiler house as seen in PGPT002.

PGPT205
Date: 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

This was one of the several successful fetes held in the 1990s and early 2000s to raise funds. Among the attractions was Punch and Judy, barrel organs etc.

Of interest: the restored pillar on the left, part of the collapsed retaining wall. It was rebuilt using materials found in the garden. The tree fern beyond it, gifted by a visitor. The recreated summerhouse at the top of the steps. The retaining wall on the West has not yet been restored.

PGPT282
Date: September 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

The serving table and chairs on the right show that this photograph was taken on a Sunday during preparations for serving teas. The summer bedding is still in full flower around the trachycarpus fortunei, which is considerably smaller than it would be 4 years later (cf PGPT237).

PGPT080
Date 21st July 2005
Source Photograph by Pat Turner

The Plantation Garden Preservation Trust (PGPT) was formed in1980 with the purpose of restoring the garden, then in a ruinous state, to its appearance in 1897. The planting scheme shown here was part of the celebration, as was an exhibition at the Assembly House, a fete, a special edition of Ex Fonte etc.

PGPT280
Date: April 2005
Source: photograph by volunteer

The magnolia on the upper lawn.

PGPT281
Date: April 2005
Source: photograph by volunteer

The rustic bridge, reconstructed in 1998 (cf PGPT374), acts both as a belvedere and a link between various paths around the garden (cf PGPT098). PGPT402 shows a view of the bridge from the upper lawn.

PGPT283
Date: July 2005
Source: photograph by volunteer

Two committee members are leading ‘Britain in Bloom’ visitors across the rustic bridge.

PGPT221
Date: 2006?
Source: photograph by volunteer

Tea in the garden on a suumer Sunday became a very popular reason for a visit in the early 2000s. Many visitors told us that they liked to bring their visitors, and elderly relatives were often mentioned! Children too could be left safely to take exercise on steps and paths on the slopes.

A lot of work by volunteers was needed to keep this going, with rotas of servers setting out tables and chairs, preparing urns, washing up, laundering linen, requesting cakes from volunteer bakers and tidying up at the end of the afternoon. Sometimes very little money has been taken, sometimes there has been a great contribution to the garden funds.

PGPT214
Date: March 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

Rock works were a very popular feature of Victorian gardens. Volcanic rock like tufa was considered the most desirable material, but, if this could not be obtained, clinker, a waste product from gasworks was an acceptable substitiute. Henry Trevor probably obtained his clinker from the works on Kett’s Hill, where the same material was used extensively in the construction of other gardens.

Cordylines can be seen in PGPT002, planted lower on the rockworks.

PGPT263
Date: 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

This photograph shows how attractive the rockworks can look. Photographs from the 1980s (PGPT387) and 1990s (PGPT370) illustrate earlier periods, and PGPT214 gives a description of the building materials used.

Water was laid on to trickle down the ‘steps’ which descend from the lump of clinker at the top, just to the right of the cordyline.

PGPT105 and 215
Date: 2006
Source: Photograph by volunteer

The ‘Gothic’ alcove before restoration (see PGPT091/103). These ruins helped to indicate the original design.

PGPT081 and PGPT109
Date April 2006
Source Photograph taken by volunteer

This view of the ‘Gothic’ alcove (Guide book 1998 p34) was taken before restoration work was undertaken (PGPT091). PGPT063 shows it covered with ivy in the 1920s.

The path behind runs from the southern end of the main lawn to the eastern end of the Rustic bridge. A pioneer volunteer remembers his pleasure at ‘discovering’ this path in the early days of restoration. it had been ‘lost’ amid the overgrown shrubs.

PGPT217
Date: 2006
Source: photograph by Cynthia Gibling

A view of the end of the rockworks which shows clearly the burnt ‘volcanic’ appearance of the clinker, as well as the ruinous state of the ‘Gothic’ alcove and the end of the restored eastern retaining wall.

PGPT083
Date May 2006
Source Photograph by volunteer

A typical sight of volunteers (Dubravka, Janet and Jill) at work on a regular Tuesday morning. Of interest is the tree fern, donated by a visitor to the garden. It was decided to accept the gift, although there is no evidence that tree ferns were planted in the garden in the 19c. They were a very popular plant in Victorian gardens – Heligan has many examples. Unfortunately the very cold winter 2010/11 killed this specimen.

The ‘blind arcading’ built into the terrace wall behind the volunteer workers is a good illustration of the ecclesiastical appearance of many structures in the garden. Below the arcading is a niche which resembles nothing so much as a ‘holy water stoup’ – an unlikely choice for an ardent Baptist!

PGPT107
Date: early 21c
Source: Photograph by volunteer

These two volunteers were responsible for many construction projects around the garden e.g. Douglas Stewart, who is wearing a green PG volunteer shirt, made steps, maintained the fountain and looked after the fish as well as organising the appeal to raise money for the reconstruction of the rustic summerhouse. John Gibling has carried out many skilful repairs of damaged woodwork, e.g. of the rustic bridge, hand rails beside steps etc.

PGPT226
Date: c.2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

The lower lawn in full summer bloom. Visible are Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and Heuchera. In the distance the summerhouse can be seen at the top of the italian terrace.

PGPT333
Date: early 2000s
Source: photograph by volunteer

A view of the Italian terrace, showing the recreated summerhouse in position at the top of the steps (see PGPT319-324).

PGPT331

Date: c.2000
Source: photograph by volunteer

Here can be seen a panel from the original 1886 summerhouse which was found in 1980 on the lawn near the Beeches (see PGPT090). This panel and the one just glimpsed on the right were decorated with ‘found’ pieces of wood to make images of swans.

PGPT332
Date: 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

Another picture of the recreated summerhouse with its heather roof (see PGPT135,114,219), before it was replaced with a roof of Norfolk reed (see PGPT090,116).

PGPT284
Date: September 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

This fountain, probably made by Doulton, seems to have been introduced into the Plantation garden by George Green (PGPT087) in the 1920s. It is very similar to the one which appears in the photograph of the conservatory of Carrow house (PGPT066).

It appears on the lawn of the Plantation house in photographs from the 1940s and 1950s, when a gardener (PGPT014) and various midwives (e.g.PGPT141) chose it as a background for their photographs. It was still in that position when the Trust took over the garden in 1980, although the upper tier was missing (cf PGPT189). Now (2013) the pieces are kept in storage.

 

PGPT287
Date: October 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

This is the new net, made to protect the pool of the fountain against falling leaves, and the fish against marauding herons. PGPT119 shows the net in use a year later.

PGPT218
Date: 2007
Source: photograph by Dubravka Yarwood

Nick Belfield-Smith became Chairman in 2007 after working for many years at a wide variety of tasks in the garden – planting, making compost, building bonfires, putting up gazebos, persuading Floranova to sponsor plants and many more.

PGPT286
Date: April 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

Visitors enjoying the spring sunshine and the winter/spring bedding as they sit in front of the rockworks.

PGPT111
Date: July 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

Set in the Italian terrace wall are 3 terracotta tiles with shields of arms, 2 small and identical, with a larger one below. Research in the early 1980s (see Ex Fonte no.4 p9) into the heraldry showed that the upper 2 tiles have arms which can be identified as belonging to particular families – Amherst, Daniel, Tyssen and Mitford. This tile, therefore, may have been commissioned by William Amhurst Tyssen-Amhurst (or Amherst), who married Margaret Mitford in 1856, and became M.P for Norfolk in the 1880s.

He lived at Foulden Hall, Didlington, which he enlarged in 1854 and 1856. It is possible that Gunton Bros made this tile for those building works as they made other heraldic tiles for the Bedingfeld family at nearby Oxburgh Hall in the 1840s. Tiles from the latter are found in the garden (see PGPT )

PGPT125
Date: May 2007
Source: Photograph by Cynthia Gibling

This ‘gargoyle’ head (perhaps another product of Gunton Bros (see PGPT104) was built into the ‘medieval’ wall at its northen end. This wall was built as a retaining wall in 1871 (date on plaque in wall) when Henry Trevor erected his Palm house. Previously the ground had sloped from the house down from the house to the fountain, but in 1871 he levelled a sufficient area to build his large Palm house (see PGPT001, 002)

PGPT211
Date: 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

The work of restoring the ‘Gothic’ alcove using materials found in the garden, was undertaken by the building firm ………See also PGPT103,105,130, and Guide book 2009 p34. All the builders who have worked on restoration in the garden have become enthusiastic about the unusual designs and materials they have been arranging, and intersested in the thinking of the original builders.

PGPT103 and PGPT091
Date 2007
Source Photograph by volunteer

Ruins in this spot (cf PGPT081) suggested the ‘Gothic’ alcove which the Trust decided to reconstruct in 2007, using original material found in the garden. It is an example of the ‘medievalising’ taste of Henry Trevor, shown also in the walls. For practical reasons it was built lower than the ivy covered remains that appear in the background of PGPT063.

PGPT114 and PGPT219
Date : July 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

The recreated rustic summerhouse at the top of the Italian steps. It is possible to see the deterioration of the heather thatched roof which led to reroofing in Norfolk reed in 2008 (see PGPT090).

The 1886 photograph of the summerhouse which the modern manufacturers used to make the reproduction can be seen in PGPT The poster on the middle back wall was a reproduction of the original seen in PGPT007.

PGPT136
Date: July 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

The fountain has always been a popular subject for photographers. It is in some ways so typical of Victorian gardens with its ostentation, its display of a taste for the medieval style, its technology, its eclectic combination of classical mouldings with its rustic flint buttresses and curious designs at the top (PGPT193-8). And yet it is a unique design, irregular and using local materials (flint from the site itself and Gunton bricks).

Even though the water is recycled with a pump, it would be wasteful to keep it running all the time, and so the water is turned on at controlled times.

PGPT110
Date: July 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

This view to the Italian terrace shows the collapse of the wall on the right hand (East) side of the lawn. PGPT092 shows reconstruction under way.

PGPT112
Date: July 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

View on to the steps and slopes of the Italian Terrace taken from the East.

The terrace does not have a date built in like the ‘medieval’ wall at the other end of the garden, but it seems likely that Henry Trevor built it at an early stage, c1860: he would not have wanted to leave the bare wall of chalk at the end of his quarry garden exposed, he would have wanted to gain access to the higher ground at the South end to gain a ‘belvedere’, and there are 2 bricks with the moulded letter ‘F’ built in to various parts of the walls here which remind us that his brother, Frederick Francis, died in 1860 and may be commemorated here – there are no other individual letter bricks in the garden.

PGPT113
Date:July 2007 (?)
Source: Photograph by volunteer

These ‘bunch of grapes’ bricks are built in to the walls shown in PGPT112. They were made, like so many of the ‘fancy’ bricks in the garden, in the the workshops of Gunton Bros of Costessey. This design can also be seen on houses in the Street at Costessey.

The Gunton family brickmaking business grew rapidly from its beginnings early in the 19c, when the work of making bricks for the medieval Costessey Hall gave them the opportunity to make the medieval styles which became so popular in the mid 19c.

PGPT115
Date: July 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

There was an unfortunate incident during a hot spell in 2007 when a young bird was so eager to drink that it fell into the fountain and was drowned. John Gibling, a volunteer, made this leaf shaped lead bird bath for the top of the rockworks in the hope of preventing other such accidents.

Bird nesting boxes have been provided in the garden too, and many birds live there. The dawn chorus has been much enjoyed by the brave souls who listen to it at 4a.m on a summer morning!

PGPT099
Date 2007
Source Photograph by volunteer

In the 1990s and early 21c a summer fete was held in July every year to raise funds for the PGPT. Bunting and flags were used around the garden as decoration. Hanging the flags on the fountain was one of the more hazardous tasks!

PGPT100
Date July 2007
Source Photograph by volunteer

This view is of the South East corner of the main lawn. Cf PGPT083 for the story of the tree ferns and the architecture of the wall behind.

PGPT126
Date: August 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

On the O.S. map of 1883, flights of steps were marked clearly on the slopes in many parts of the garden, though by 1980 many had almost disappeared. This photograph shows the reconstruction of steps leading from the wide space at the top of the Italian terrace to the path running round the upper boundary of the garden.

PGPT127
Date: August 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

Several beds in the garden, including 3 on the lower lawn, are planted twice each year with bedding plants in a modified version of Henry Trevor’s original ‘carpet bedding’. In 2007 this central ‘wheel bed’ had a central plant of Fatsia japonica, with spokes formed by Ophiopogon and triangles of pink and white begonias. A box edging surrounded the whole.

Henry Trevor’s aim was that there should be attractive views down from the walks he created around the sloping sides ( see PGPT098 for plan with walks marked).

PGPT101
Date: October 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

Kitty Plaskitt was one of the original volunteers who worked in the garden from 1980.

PGPT128

Date: 2007
Source: Richard Horne
This is the design for the shelter drawn by Richard Horne, the craftsman who built it.

PGPT057
Date 2007
Source: Volunteer’s photograph

In 2007 it was decided that it would be very useful to have a shelter in the yard at the entrance to the garden, to provide some protection for volunteers – both those who gathered on Tuesdays to work in the garden and those who collected entrance fees for various events.

The design was based on a drawing (no.653) in the 1898 catalogue of Boulton and Paul. The drawing was of a shelter in front of a stable. The maker was Richard Horne (cf PGPT094/5). Oak was the timber used. The photograph show the components before assembly on site.

PGPT095 and PGPT120
Date: 1898 and October 2007
Source: Boulton & Paul catalogue and photograph by volunteer

When the Trust decided to build a shelter in the entrance yard of the garden (originally the site of glasshouses and fruit stores) the Boulton & Paul catalogue was consulted, since Henry Trevor had used their design for his Palm House. This drawing, no. 653 in the catalogue, provided a suitable model.

The oak shelter finished!(see PGPT057,094/5,117/8). Also visible is the Victorian post box used as an ‘honesty box’ for entrance fees when no volunteers are present (see PGPT084).

PGPT117, 118 and 121
Date : September 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

The shelter in the yard under construction (see PGPT057,094/5)

Note the gazebo which had served as a shelter for the volunteers tea breaks in the past.

PGPT094 and PGPT222
Date 2007
Source Photograph by volunteer

Richard Horne was the craftsman who built the oak shelter, a practical addition for volunteers who work in the garden or welcome visitors (cf PGPT057).

PGPT124
Date: September 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

Volunteers here make use of the newly finished shelter to take their mid-morning break. The ‘Tuesday Group’ was so named because they meet regularly on Tuesday mornings to do gardening, repairs and construction work. Their efforts over the years have made a great contribution to the garden.

PGPT122 and PGPT123
Date: September 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

Head Gardener Marjorie Wilson is examining the notice tied on to the trunk of a clematis which climbs into a yew tree near the west end of the rustic bridge. This trunk has so large a circumference that the PGPT claims it as champion of the UK, and considers it may have been planted during Henry Trevor’s life.

PGPT131 and PGPT129
Date: October 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

This view was taken to show the damage done by foxes digging up the lawn in search of worms and other prey. Urban foxes are a regular nuisance in the centre of Norwich and can often be seen crossing gardens even in broad daylight. For some years they have have made lairs (see PGPT130) and produced cubs in the Plantation, so that the Trust has been forced to place unsightly fences around the flower beds to preserve the plants. It would be very difficult to get rid of them without upsetting many people who (quite rightly) consider that foxes, especially the cubs, are a charming sight.

In the background is another view of the collapse of the south west bank before the retaining wall was restored (see PGPT110, 092/3)

PGPT130
Date: October 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

This photograph shows the path along the lower level of the eastern slope (see PGPT109). Like PGPT129, it shows damage done by foxes – the sandy soil on the path has been scattered by foxes digging their lair in the slope above.

Of interest also is this view of the side and top of the restored ‘Gothic alcove’ (see PGPT091,103).

PGPT119
Date: October 2007
Source: Photograph by volunteer

The purpose of the net placed over the fountain each autumn is twofold:to stop leaves falling into the water to the detriment of the fish, and to prevent a repetition of the occasion when a heron ate all the fish! In 2006 an old torn net was replaced with this smart new one, made by Cynthia and John Gibling.

PGPT209
Date: 2007
Source: photograph in PGPT archive

In 2007 a female artist brought this painting in to the garden with the suggestion that prints should be made and sold for the benefit of the PGPT and the artist herself. The project was not pursued.

PGPT090
Date 2008
Source Photograph by volunteer

This photograph was taken from a high viewpoint at the South end of the garden, looking across the thatched roof of the summerhouse past the balustrade on to the main lawn.

In 1980 the ruins of a thatched summerhouse were found on the lawn beside the Beeches. No such structure was shown in that position on the 1883 O.S. map. However, the map did show a structure with measurements corresponding to the remaining sections at the top of the terrace at the South end and in 19xx the Trust raised funds to recreate a summerhouse in that position, using the evidence of a photograph ( ) and remaining fragments. A small piece of the roof showed that it had been made of heather, and so the reconstruction was roofed with heather. Unfortunately this did not prove successful under the canopy of the trees, and in 2008 the structure was re-roofed with Norfolk reed.

PGPT116
Date: April 2008
Source: Photograph by volunteer

A view of the restored rustic summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace, after the roof had been renovated with Norfolk reed (see PGPT090).

Visible on the inside wall is an information board about the summerhouse.

PGPT088 and PGPT237
Spring

Source: Photos by Dubravka Yarwood

PGPT239 and PGPT240
Date: April 2008
Source: photographs by Dubravka Yarwood

The spring bedding this year was, top, Bellis/Myosotis
bottom, Wallflowers/Tulips

PGPT089
Date 2008
Source Photograph by Cynthia Gibling

The large flints which appear in the buttresses of the fountain remind us that flints were mined on the site of the garden in medieval times. A reminder of the extensive system of tunnels which still survives in the area came in 1984 when a bus travelling up the Earlham Road towards the city suddenly slipped into a hole created by the collapse of the roof of one such tunnel just opposite the entrance to the garden. Fortunately noone was hurt, but considerable work was done to prevent a repetition of the accident.

The flints, as usual, were embedded in chalk, which by the 19c was burnt in 2 lime kilns in the garden to make mortar for building work.

PGPT242
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

A view looking North of a jazz concert, one of the popular musical events which finds a ideal venue in the garden (if the weather is kind!)

PGPT273
Date: July 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

Many visitors thoroughly enjoy the peace and quiet they can find in the garden. Note the section of ‘medieval’ wall in the background, and the exotic echium which astonished visitors for a season.

PGPT241
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by Dubravka Yarwood

This oblique view of the Italian terrace and rustic summerhouse shows that it is quite a steep climb from the lawn up the slope, which was probably a chalk cliff at the south end of the quarry when Henry Trevor began work on his garden.

PGPT216
Date: July 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

This picture shows a group of volunteers who work on Tuesday mornings on all the gardening jobs needed to keep the Plantation looking attractive for visitors. Left – right they are Cynthia (who set up and runs the web site), Marj (Head Gardener), Janet, Dubravka and Jill.The picture was taken on the triangle above the entrance yard, where much hard work is done in propagating plants both for the garden and to sell.

N.B. in the background a polytunnel which was later replaced with a permanent greenhouse in 2009.

PGPT225
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by Cynthia Gibling

Marj Wilson was involved as a volunteer in the Plantation from its early days. Later she did more and more organising of planning and planting and became Head gardener. She designed schemes for the rockworks, the beds on and around the Palm house lawn, in the entrance yard and along the West of the main lawn, as well as organising the regular planning and planting of spring and summer beds. She has made beautiful plans to help visitors identify the plants in the garden.

She has regularly shown favouritism towards those plants which originate from her native South Africa!

PGPT238
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by Dubravka Yarwood

John Scotting has been a long term member of the Tuesday group of volunteers, His speciality has been pruning, and the very many old shrubs in the garden give him plenty of scope.

PGPT243
Date: August 2008
Source: photograph by Marjorie Wilson

A view looking North in which can be seen the summer bedding …….., the fountain, the glazed shed and the rustic bridge.

PGPT244
Date: August 2008
Source: photograph by Marjorie Wilson

The planting in the foreground includes Astilbes, Diksonia antartica (tree ferns),……….In the background can be seen the wall restored in the south east corner of the lawn and the restored Gothis alcove beyond.

PGPT132
Date: October 2008
Source: Photograph by volunteer

The summer of 2008 was a hot one, as this picture of fruit setting on the banana plant ( ) which grew on the upper lawn testifies!

PGPT224
Date: October 2008
Source: photograph by Cynthia Gibling

Cobaea Scandens flowered on the bridge

PGPT133
Date: October 2008
Source: Photograph by volunteer

In 1842 Henry Trevor opened a furnishing business in Norwich (see PGPT079). The business flourished, first under Trevor’s own name, later as Trevor and Page when he took his eldest stepson into partnership (see PGPT007,106). Eventually the name was shortened to Trevor Page.The business was finally closed in 1983, by which time it had been under the control of Hodge for some years. Hodge preserved the sign which had hung outside the shop, relocated to Queen St, together with its iron support. The sign had been repainted by the firm in the 20c: the support may date back to the 19c.

Hodges donated the sign to the PGPT, and it was decided to restore and erect it in the entrance yard, together with an information board about the history of Trevor Page.

PGPT134
Date: October 2008
Source: Photograph by volunteer

In 1994 an accidental slip of the foot led to the discovery of this brick pediment in the bank to the East of the summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace (see Ex Fonte 14 for a drawing and full report).

It has the date 1880 carved into the brick, almost hidden among the carvings of fruit and foliage, and the letter ‘J’ (?) may be carved in the centre. This is one of the few dated items that appear in the garden, and shows that Henry Trevor was continually changing and adding to his garden.

PGPT227
Date: October 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

There is a date plaque set into this wall with the date 1871, so we know that Henry Trevor built it 15 years after he completed his house.It was part of his scheme for adding a Palm house to his garden (see PGPT125). The house is plain and classical in style, the fountain, built in 1857, is decidedly Gothic, and Henry Trevor’s taste for the medieval style reappears strongly again in this wall. We know that he walked to his business daily, and on the way would have passed several medieval churches and the city walls, so he had plenty of opportunity to collect ideas for the very idiosyncratic designs that appear along its length – a gargoyle, a cross, a dog’s head (see PGPT148), a ‘man’, a coat of arms. Various Gunton bricks – thistle, rose, fleur-de-lys – add to the confusion or interest depending on your taste!

PGPT340
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by Shirley-Ann Humphries

The garden has often tempted photographers after a fall of snow!

PGPT250
Date: Spring 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

Unlike the foxes, frogs receive an unqualified welcome in the garden! They arrive from all over the garden every spring, make a great deal of amorous noise and clamber into the fountain basin, whatever obstacles need overcoming, to create another generation for the garden!

PGPT231
Gable restoration completed Spring 2009

PGPT092 and PGPT093
Date 2009
Source Photographs by Douglas Stewart, volunteer

The retaining wall in the south west corner of the main lawn was already in a state of collapse in 1980. PGPT110 shows its state in July 2007, before restoration began. The Trust decided to rebuild it in 2009,with an inner skin of breeze blocks to give stability as this photograph shows. A facing of original material found in the garden was added, using many of the ‘fancy’ bricks which Henry Trevor had obtained from Gunton Bros for his walls.

PGPT232 and PGPT233
Date: February 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

These 2 photographs show a further stage of the work being carried out in PGPT092/3.
The retaining wall in the south west corner of the main lawn was restored by building an inner skin of breeze blocks, then adding a facing built in ‘Trevoresque’ style using the many fancy bricks which had been gathered from around the garden and stored in the shed since 1980. As described in PGPT211, all the builders who have worked on restorations have become enthusiastic about examining original walls and adapting ideas from them.

PGPT234 and PGPT251
Speckled Wood butterfly

2009

PGPT235
Date: March 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

The PGPT was very grateful to receive a legacy from a well-wisher, Michael Andrews, who left the PGPT over £50,000 when he died in 2007. It was decided to spend this on an Alitex, Victorian-style, double-glazed, aluminium-framed green house to replace the polytunnel which had done service since 2003. The green house has helped the gardeners considerably in their work of propagating and tending plants both for the garden and for sale.

This picture shows it in the course of construction.

PGPT245
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by Cynthia Gibling

For the story of this greenhouse see PGPT235, where it is seen partly built.
While this greenhouse is not an exact replica of the original, it is typical of the style of the time.

PGPT279
Date: July 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

The south east corner of the lower lawn, showing the decorative walls and flourishing tree ferns. In the harsh winter of 2011/12 the large tree fern received a severe set-back, but recovered enough to produce a single frond in the summer of 2012.

PGPT084
Date July 2009
Source Photograph by volunteer

In the 1990s a decision was taken to set up an ‘honesty box’ in the hope that visitors to the garden would pay an entrance fee even when there was no volunteer to take their money. To the surprise of many, this soon became an important source of income. The first box was modern and ordinary, but Bruce Adam, then chairman, made enquiries of the Post Office, who kindly donated a Victorian box. A pillar was built to house it, using materials found in the garden.

Volunteers emptied it every day after the occasion when a thief broke the box to reach the money.

PGPT247
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

The 1883 map shows that Henry Trevor’s design included many flights of steps to exploit the differnt levels of the garden, so as to make interesting walks and give varied views from above on to the colourful flower beds below. many of these flights have been lost, some have been restored, and some await repair. This flight, to the East of the rustic summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace, were rebuilt by Doug Stewart and Graham Pierce.

PGPT274
Date: July 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

The garden in full summer bloom. The seat resembles those shown in the Boulton and Paul catalogue of 1898 (PGPT077).

PGPT275
Date: July 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

Another attractive view, where the tower of St John’s R.C. cathedral can be seen in the background. Henry Trevor must have been very pleased when this building in the ‘medieval’ style was begun in 1890, replacing the prison (PGPT229) which had stood on the site since before he built the Plantation house in 1856.

PGPT276
Date: July 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

This view of the rockworks shows how well the planting planned by Marj Wilson and Lesley Cuneen had developed by 2009 (cf PGPT214). The prominence of ferns and cordylines echoes the taste of Victorian gardeners.

PGPT277
Date: July 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

The ‘fly in the ointment’ spoiling this view of the garden looking south is the barricade of fences around the rectangular bed: these have to be erected to make sure that foxes do not dig up the summer bedding plants in their early stages.
Otherwise the scene is one of improvements: the restored summerhouse at the top of the steps, the restored S.W.wall (cf PGPT129).

PGPT248
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

Foxes have made their earths and bred in the Plantation for several years. Cubs make an endearing sight for visitors, but they ruin flower beds, dig up lawns and weaken banks, so they do present a problem in the Plantation and indeed in many parts of Norwich.

PGPT251
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

Many of our volunteers and visitors find the greatest pleasure of their visits to the garden is the opportunity to see a variety of flora and fauna, like this Speckled Wood butterfly.

PGPT278
Date: July 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

On the O.S. 1883 map a flight of steps is shown leading from the south east of the upper terrace to the path which ran around the circumference of the top of the garden. In 2009 work was begun to uncover the remains of the original steps and reconstruct them.This photograph shows the work at an early stage: PGPT247 shows the project completed.

PGPT288
Date: 20th September 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

See PGPT235 for the story of how the Trust was able to build a new greenhouse in 2009. The structure is not an exact replica of the original (we have no evidence of its appearance) but it has been built in a ‘Victorian’ style on the site of an original structure. PGPT235 shows the interior in the course of construction, and PGPT245 the exterior.
This photograph was taken when the greenhouse was officially opened by chairman Nick Belfield-Smith.

PGPT433

December 2009

The tree ferns survived 2009/2010 but were lost the following winter.

Photo by Andy Jones

PGPT434

December 2009

Photo by Andy Jones

PGPT435

December

Without the leaves on the great copper beech tree, the cathedral is easy to see.
The leaf cover is on the fountain and the fox deterrent fences border the formal bedding.

Photo by Andy Jones

PGPT436

December 2009

Photo by Andy Jones